Disclaimer: The information contained on this site is for information purposes only, and may not apply to your situation. The author, publisher, distributor and provider provide no warranty about the content or accuracy of content enclosed. Information provided is subjective. Keep this in mind when reviewing this guide. Neither the Publisher nor Author shall be liable for any loss of profit or any other commercial damages resulting from use of this guide.  All links are for information purposes only and are not warranted for content, accuracy, or any other implied or explicit purpose.

 

  • ABOUT THE BREED
  • WHY YOU SHOULD NOT PICK AN AKC BREEDER!
  • HISTORY OF THE BREED
  • LIFE EXPECTENCY
  • EXERCISE
  • SIZE AND APPEARABCE
  • TESTING

The Tibetan Mastiff, as it is a primitive breed of dog, has a set of unique characteristic related solely to the breed. For example, many Tibetan Mastiffs shed their coat once a year, generally in the spring, lasting approximately four weeks.

Tibetan Mastiffs are a clean dog breed and very easily house trained. Lacking the usual canine smell, the fact they do not continual shed has led to Tibetan Mastiff becoming known as a hypoallergenic dog, generally suited to anyone with allergies to dog hair.

When a Tibetan Mastiff is shedding its coat egular grooming in long periods is required. This is to ensure that any loose hair from the undercoat is brought up through the oute coat and not left to become dirty and matted. Although time consuming, it is a very easy process and simply requires a soft but firm downward stroke to the Tibetan Mastiff's coat. Due to the nature of the coat, some owners use a hair dryer to aid the process, as this helps to loosen any hair that may have become slightly knotted in the coat.

The Tibetan Mastiff can live in an apartment life if they are very well exercised. They are not very active indoors.

Temperament

The native type of dog, which still exists in Tibet, and the Westernized purebred breed can vary in temperament—but so can dogs of identical breeding, within the same litter, raised in the same household. Elizabeth Schuler states, "The few individuals that remain in Tibet are ferocious and aggressive, unpredictable in their behavior, and very difficult to train. But the dogs bred by the English are obedient and attached to their masters." However, other observers have found the dogs remaining in Tibet to be quite approachable under the right circumstances—and some Western-bred dogs to be completely unapproachable. Some Western and Asian breeders are seeking to create a replica of the legendary dog which they identify as the "true Tibetan Mastiff" or "Tsang-khyi". Some breeders appear to select primarily for appearance (great size, profuse coat, heavy wrinkling, jowls, haw) while others also select for "soft" temperament (in the West) and fierce temperament (in Asia where the dogs' "ferocity" is much vaunted and encouraged). As a flock guardian dog in Tibet and in the West, it is tenacious in its ability to confront predators the size of wolves and leopards. As a socialized, more domestic dog, it can thrive in a spacious, fenced yard with a canine companion, but it is generally not an appropriate dog for apartment living. The Western-bred dogs are generally more easy-going, although somewhat aloof with strangers coming to the home. Through hundreds of years of selective breeding for a protective flock and family guardian, the breed has been prized for being a nocturnal sentry, keeping would-be predators and intruders at bay, barking at sounds throughout the night. Leaving a Tibetan Mastiff outside all night with neighbors nearby is not recommended. They often sleep during the day to be more active, alert and aware at night. Like all flock guardian breeds, they are intelligent and stubborn to a fault, so obedience training is recommended (although only mildly successful with some individuals) since this is a strong-willed, powerful breed. Socialization is also critical with this breed because of their reserved nature with strangers and guardian instincts. They are excellent family dogs—for the right family. Owners must understand canine psychology and be willing and able to assume the primary leadership position. Lack of consistent, rational discipline can result in the creation of dangerous, unpredictable dogs(although this is true of virtually every dog breed). Newspaper reports have suggested that a pair of these Mastiffs have killed tigers while guarding sheep in the highlands of Nepal. SOURCE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tibetan_Mastiff

Based on my personal experiences; choosing an AKC breeder would be a huge mistake. Folllow the money and you will see that you could be setting yourself up for getting something that really isn't what you were sold. I have found so much deception among the AKC and it's show breeders. I refer to the show breeders as AKC "corporate puppy mills", who bring in hundreds or thousands of dollars in revenue to the "mother" organization. With so much money on the line; do you really believe there are ethical people involved in the AKC? Based on my experiences they are not very honest and in many cases very deceitful. I personally would never rely on the truth in breeding, tests, etc. considering I have seen how easy it is for people to register litters without the permission or signature of owners. But you do not have to take my word for it because there are plenty of articles on this subject all over the internet. AKC show breeders have so much money riding on the dogs that I have heard of all types of different schemes to get passing results on dogs that might otherwise fail. There really is not a whole lot of checking going on within the AKC. I highly recommend non show breeders whom the AKC show breeders refer to as back yard breeders. They really are not bad and most have the same lines in the pedigrees! I find the small hobby breeders to be far more ethical than people with so much money "riding on the dogs". I believe AKC breeders breed for the ring and nothing else. I have yet to find one who is ethical and honest within the Tibetan Mastiff AKC community. They are the first ones to make up lies about non-show breeders yet they spend much time and energy trying to get their dogs. That says a lot in my mind.

The information contained on this site is for information purposes only, and may not apply to your situation. The author, publisher, distributor and provider provide no warranty about the content or accuracy of content enclosed. Information provided is subjective. Keep this in mind when reviewing this guide.Neither the Publisher nor Author shall be liable for any loss of profit or any other commercial damages resulting from use of this guide.  All links are for information purposes only and are not warranted for content, accuracy, or any other implied or explicit purpose.